Medical

When a young person comes into care they are checked for urgent conditions. They are asked through an interpreter if there is any specific problem or pain.

Days 1-2

NEEDS:

  • Urgent response to immediate health needs
  • Checks for Scabies

When the young person comes into care they are checked for urgent medical issues.  They are asked through an interpreter if there is any specific problems of pain.  If identified, appointments are made, or they are taken to the local NHS walk-in/emergency centre.

The young person is assessed for scabies and if there are signs, they are given the treatment and all their clothes are given a thorough, high temperature wash.  This continues to be monitored to ensure the scabies has gone.

There is a 24/7 on call support for medical emergencies

Weeks 1-2

NEEDS:

  • Doctor & dentist registration and booking for immunisations
  • Initial health checks

The young person is registered with a local doctors and dentist within the first couple of weeks and appointments are made for initial health checks and immunisations.

Some doctors’ surgeries use language line within their service.  This is helpful, especially for the early appointments, to help the doctors understand any problems.

The support worker completes an HC1 form to allow free prescriptions and access to an opticians.

The support worker, through the social worker will link with the local authority LAC Nurse who will arrange a time to visit the young person and do an initial health assessment.

24/7 on call support for medical emergencies continues.

Months 1-4

NEEDS:

  • Immunisations
  • Dental checks & follow up
  • Opticians
  • Learning about NHS
  • Learning how to take medication

The support worker uses an interpreter to explain the immunisations and what will happen at the doctor and dentist appointments.  It is possible this is the first time they have had injections or had their teeth checked so it is important they understand what is going to happen and why.

Appointments are made and support workers accompany the young people as they start their immunisation injections with the surgery nurse.  These injections usually happen over three appointments, each four weeks apart.  If additional medical appointments are required, these are made separately with the Doctor and again the support worker will accompany the young person.

The young person is taught about the different types of medication and the risks of taking too much or not taking medication if required.  Initially this is closely monitored by the support worker.

Dental appointments are also booked in and support workers again accompany them.  During this time the young people usually have to be told about the need to brush their teeth regularly and to cut down on sugar.  If fillings or additional dental work is required, follow up appointments are booked in.

Upon receipt of their HC2 forms, the young people are booked in to opticians for an initial check.

24/7 on call support for medical emergencies continues.

Semi Independence

NEEDS:

  • Learning how and when to make appointments
  • Understanding when to use the pharmacists, the doctors, walk in centres and A&E

The young people are supported to be able to make appointments over the phone.  They sit with a support worker to make the calls and prior to this they practice the English they need.

In line with risk assessments, the young person is given full responsibility for taking their own medication.

24/7 on call support for medical emergencies continues.

Move to Independence

NEEDS:

  • Independently following up medical needs

The young person is expected to be making appointments themselves and attend them fully independently.  The support worker ensures this is happening and provides extra support if required or if additional medical needs occur.

24/7 on call support for medical emergencies continues.